You are here: Home about the programme Core Modules

Core Modules

The Core Modules should provide all students with basic knowledge of the relevant topics. They close any gaps in knowledge, build bridges and ensure that all students have a common basic knowledge.


A total of 5 Core Modules (25 ECTS) must be completed in the first and second semesters.
If 2 Core Modules are offered in parallel, you can choose between both modules.

 

**due to the Corona pandemic moduls can be different**

 

1. Semester (winter)

Forschungskompetenzen

Modulkoordination

Sylvia Kruse

Weitere beteiligte Lehrende

 -

Lehrmethoden

Vorlesung, Übung, Seminar

Prüfungsform

Mündliche Präsentation: Vortrag und Posterpräsentation (50%)
Schriftliche Ausarbeitung: Wissenschaftliche Texte (5-15 Seiten, 50%)

Inhalt

Forschungskompetenzen sind Kompetenzen, die Forschende für das wissenschaftliche Arbeiten im Masterstudium und für Ihre akademische Karriere benötigen. Dazu gehört:

  • Einführung in die Wissenschaftstheorie und Verortung verschiedener forst- und umweltwissenschaftlicher Disziplinen und methodologischer Zugänge
  • Die Entwicklung und Formulierung von Forschungsfragen und Hypothesen
  • Planung und Ausführung von Forschungsvorhaben (von der ersten Idee über die Ausarbeitung des Forschungsdesigns für theoretische und empirische Fragestellungen über systematische Literaturrecherche, Auswahl von Forschungsmethoden bis hin zur Darstellung und kritischen Diskussion von Ergebnissen)
  • Schreibkompetenzen (Aufbau von Texten, Argumentationsketten, roter Faden, wissenschaftliches Formulieren, Illustration durch Grafiken)
  • Qualitätskriterien wissenschaftlichen Arbeitens (Überprüfbarkeit, Reliabilität, Validität, Redlichkeit und gute wissenschaftliche Praxis, etc.)

Lerninhalte werden mit Übungen und kleineren Projekten angewandt und in Einzel-/Gruppenarbeit erprobt

Qualifikations- und Lernziele

Die Studierenden sollen

  • Verständnis für Probleme der politischen Steuerung (Anlass, Ansätze, Wirksamkeit) gewinnen,
  • Kenntnis ausgewählter theoretischer Grundlagen (Steuerungskonzepte, Steuerungsinstrumente) erhalten,
  • die Fähigkeit praktische Steuerungsbemühungen einer Analyse und kritischen Würdigung zu unterziehen gewinnen sowie
  • die Fähigkeit eigene Vorstellungen und Vorschläge zur politischen Steuerung der Waldnutzung entwickeln und vertreten zu können erlangen.

Literatur und Arbeitsmaterial

Literatur und Arbeitsmaterial wird rechtzeitig mitgeteilt bzw. auf Ilias bereitgestellt

Research Skills

Module coordination

Dr. Jochen Fründ

Additional Lecturers

Prof. Dr. Carsten Dormann

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lectures, tutored exercises, group work

Type of examination

Project paper (developed in series of assignments) (5-15 pages, 50%)
Oral presentation (50%)

Syllabus

 Research skills refer to a mixture of abilities that researchers need to acquire at some point in their career. Most of them are also useful beyond research and the scope of this module is thus a very wide one. The content falls broadly into the following categories:

  • Generating ideas and hypotheses: sketching ideas, flowcharts, logical thinking, brainstorming, finding parallels/metaphors
  • Planning and executing science: experimental design, identifying a good hypothesis, statistics basics
  • Good scientific practice: reproducibility, validity, lab notebook, versioning, backups, plagiarism/fraud
  • Knowing the state of the art: literature reviews, online searches, when to look (and when not to), judging quality of findings, track records and ratings, quick reading; social media and science, citing literature
  • Scientific communication, writing and graphics: publication formats and their structure, free software for data analysis and writing (LibreOffice, LaTeX, JabRef, R); telling a story with scientific results and data, tables vs. figures; what to keep in/out; writing style, typical language issues; graphic quality
  • Presentations and Posters (harmonizing audience, aim and own personality; the role of surprise; new/known-balance)

Learning goals and qualifications

Students

  • will get a broader horizon of research practice and a better understanding of the scientific method
  • understand how to formulate a research question and hypotheses
  • understand the importance of communication of research results
  • know some important tools and software for scientific activities

Core Readings

  • W.C. Booth, G.G. Colomb and J.M. Williams (2003) The craft of research. University of Chicago Press 2nd / 3rd edition.
  • Florian Hartig. Lecture Notes “Research Skills” (http://florianhartig.github.io/ResearchSkills/, https://www.dropbox.com/s/1otretqxn2o34e3/ResearchSkills.pdf)

 


Ecosystem Processes and Functioning

Module coordination

Prof. Dr. Christiane Werner

Additional Lecturers

Dr. Tim Burzlaff, PD Dr. Jürgen Kreuzwieser

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lecture, tutoria, group work

Type of examination

Written Exam (90 min)

Syllabus

This module will cover different aspects of ecosystem processes across scales, providing insights on advanced knowledge on ecosystem functioning.

It will cover the fundamental ecological processes of ecosystems, such as the carbon and water cycle, biogeochemical (or nutrient) cycling, soil processes, and community dynamics. Lectures will showcase how ecosystem functioning is driven by changes in the environmental factors, while in turn ecosystems processes feed-back on the environment. In the first two weeks lectures will cover how ecosystem functions relate to structural components of an ecosystem (e.g. vegetation, water, soil, atmosphere and biota) and how they interact with each other, within and across ecosystems. These contents will be accompanied by lecture material to deepen the knowledge. The third week will be used to discuss specific aspects and interlink the different thematic fields.

Learning Goals and Qualifications

Students will

  • get an overview on ecosystem processes and functioning at an advanced level from a scientific point of view.
  • be qualified to critically follow the scientific and public debates on the subject and give them background knowledge for careers in research, education and consultancy.
  • achieve an in depth understanding of the complexity and interactions of processes within ecosystems and their feedback on the environment.
  • study examples of case studies and additional literature, which will be provided to deepen their understanding of such processes

Literature

Will be provided during the course.

 


Environmental Policy

Module coordination

Dr. Sylvia Kruse

Additional Lecturers

 -

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lectures, exercises

Type of examination

Written exam (90 min, 30%)
Written assignment (5-15 pages, 70%)

Syllabus

In this course, students will learn how to analyse environmental policy and governance arrangements as well as environmental conflicts from a political science point of view. The course considers different analytical perspectives focussing on the following dimensions:

  • the process of problem formulation, policy making and implementation of environmental policies
  • the role of state and non-state actors and their interaction within the policy process
  • policy instruments and mechanisms of environmental governance and regulation.

 

Different schools of thought and policy theories (e.g. rational choice, institutionalist approaches, discourse analysis) will be introduced as analytical tools for the analysis of environmental policymaking. Examples from various environmental issues (e.g., ecosystem management, biodiversity conservation, multifunctional use of natural resources, climate policy, participation in environmental conflict management) ranging from the international to the local level will serve as case studies for policy analysis.

Learning Goals and Qualifications

The students

  • will gain an understanding of selected subjects of environmental policy.
  • develop an understanding of different approaches of governance and regulation, including effectiveness     and challenges of policy making and implementation.
  • become familiar with selected theoretical and conceptual approaches of public policy analysis.
  • develop the capacity to analyse political processes and policy making in the environmental sector.
  • critically reflect about environmental policy making and implementation.

Literature

  • Knill, C., Tosun, J. (2012): Public Policy. A New Introduction. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmilan.
  • A list of relevant texts (obligatory / voluntary readings) will be made available at the beginning of the course

Environmental Economics

Module coordination

Prof. Dr. Stefan Baumgärtner

Additional Lecturers

 -

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lecture, Tutorial

Type of examination

Written final exam (90 min)

Syllabus

In this course, students will learn how to analyze the natural environment and natural resources from an economic perspective. To this end, students will learn intermediate and advanced concepts and methods from ecological, environmental and resource economics, and apply them to analyze economy-environment systems.

Topics to be covered include the following:

  • Review of basic concepts from microeconomics (scarcity, efficiency, households, firms, markets)
  • Welfare analysis of markets, market failure and market regulation:
    • public goods      
    • common-pool-resources
    • externalities
    • government failure
  • Economic valuation of environmental quality and natural resources
  • Decision-making under uncertainty: risk, resilience, and insurance

! Recommended:

  • Basic knowledge of environmental economics or ecological economic/microeconomics
  • Good working knowledge of basic algebra and calculus

Learning Goals and Qualifications:

Students:

  • know advanced theories, methods and empirical facts of environmental economics and can reproduce them
  • students are able to critically reflect the economic approach to analyzing the natural environment, including its premises and limitations, and can explain it in a comprehensible manner
  • can independently apply advanced theories and methods of environmental economics to simple problems of the natural environment and resources
  • are able to systematically analyze the mutual interdependencies between economic and environmental variables at an advanced level

Literature

There is no single textbook for this course. Good references for several chapters of the course include the following:

  • M. Common and S. Stagl: Ecological Economics. An Introduction, Cambridge University Press, 2005
  • H.E. Daly and J. Farley: Ecological Economics. Principles and Applications, Washington DC: Island Press, 2004
  • Endres and V. Radke: Economics for Environmental Studies. A Strategic Guide to Micro- and Macroeconomics, Springer, 2012
  • N. Hanley, J.F. Shogren and B. White: Introduction to Environmental Economics, Oxford University Press, 2001
  • N. Hanley, J.F. Shogren and B. White: Environmental Economics in Theory and Practice, 2nd edition, Palgrave Macmillan, 2007
  • R. Perman, Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, 3rd edition, Pearson Education, 2003

 

2. Semester (summer)

Nachhaltiges Energie- und Stoffstrommanagement

Modulkoordination

Stefan Pauliuk

Weitere beteiligte Lehrende

GastvorleserIn vom Öko-Institut

Lehrmethoden

Vorlesungen/Übungen, Computerpraktikum, Exkursion

Prüfungsform

Klausur (60%), schriftliche Ausarbeitung: Pflichtübung (5-15 Seiten, 40%)

Inhalte

Im Modul „Nachhaltiges Energie- und Stoffstrommanagement“ erlernen die Studierenden die Grundlagen und die Anwendung der quantitativen Systemanalyse auf sozioökologische Systeme. Das Modul verbindet die Theorie sozioökologischer Systeme (1) mit den Grundlagen der quantitativen Analyse von Systemen (2). Außerdem wird umfangreiches Faktenwissen über die stoffliche und energetische Grundlage unserer Gesellschaft (3) sowie Methodenkompetenz zu deren Analyse (4) vermittelt. Die vier Bereiche werden in den Vorlesungen und Übungen eng miteinander verzahnt.

1) Theorie sozioökologischer Systeme: Ausgehen vom ‚Zwei-Sphären-Modell‘ wird eine interdisziplinäre Theorie sozio-ökologischer Systeme (SES, von socioecological systems) vorgestellt, die als theoretisches Fundament des gesamten Kurses dient. Es wird gezeigt wie Brückenkonzepte und Paradigmen verschiedene Aspekte von SES vom Blickwinkel der Sozial- und Naturwissenschaften beschreiben. Zentrale Konzepte der Beschreibung und praktischen Umsetzung von Nachhaltigkeit werden vorgestellt und mit Hilfe der allgemeinen Theorie eingeordnet. Diese Konzepte sind z.B. ‚Safe operating space for humanity‘, soziometabolische Regimes, soziometabolische Übergänge, ‚Sustainable Development Goals‘, sowie die Wirtschaftsformen ‚circular economy‘, ‚performance economy‘, bioeconomy’, sowie ‘spaceman economy‘.

2) Grundlagen der quantitativen Systemanalyse
: Systemdefinition, Systemvariablen und Parameter, Bilanzgleichungen, Systemgleichungen und deren analytische und numerische Lösung, Fehlerbetrachtung und Fehlerfortpflanzung, Datenqualität und Messabweichungen, statische, stationäre und dynamische Systeme, Stoffkreisläufe und Produktsysteme

3) Methoden der Systemanalyse: Die Energie- und Stoffstromanalyse industrieller Systeme ist die grundlegende Methode zur Quantifizierung der Energie- und Materialebene der menschlichen Gesellschaft (Baccini und Brunner 2012). Mit ihrer Hilfe werden die Material- und Energieflüsse und -bestände in technischen Prozessen in einem Systemkontext erfasst und so die Grundlage für die Bewertung und Entscheidungsfindung gelegt. Die Input-Output-Analyse ist ein wichtiges Werkzeug zum Studium industrieller Systeme und zur Berechnung von sogenannten Fußabdrücken für CO2, Wasser, Landnutzung und andere Ressourcen. Beide Methoden werden ausführlich erläutert und anhand von mehreren Übungen vermittelt. Außerdem werden die Grundlagen der Ökobilanzierung vermittelt. Die Ökobilanzierung (Englisch: Life Cycle Assessment, LCA) ist eine weithin akzeptierte und angewandte Methode zur Umweltbewertung von Produkten und Dienstleistungen.

4) Die biophysikalische Grundlage der menschlichen Gesellschaft und deren nachhaltige Umgestaltung: Neben der Theorie und den Methoden des Stoffstrommanagements wird in speziellen Hintergrundvorlesungen umfangreiches Faktenwissen über die stofflichen und energetischen Grundlagen zentraler menschlicher Aktivitäten wie Wohnen, Arbeiten, Transport, Kommunikation, Ernährung oder Reinigung vermittelt, welches dann auch die Grundlage für die jeweiligen Übungen bildet. Zu den Fakten kommt das Wissen um die Zusammenhänge im System ‚gesellschaftlicher Stoffwechsel‘ und um den Umbau des gesellschaftlichen Stoffwechsels in Hinblick auf dessen nachhaltige Entwicklung. Der letzte Punkt speist sich vor allem aus dem Fünften Sachstandsbericht des IPCC.

Folgende mathematische Methoden kommen während des Kurses zu Anwendung:

  • Grundlagen der linearen Algebra: Matrixmultiplikation und –inversion, Multiplikation von Matrizen mit Vektoren, Umstellung von Matrixgleichungen, lineare Gleichungssysteme
  • Ausführen einfacher Berechnungen mit MS Excel (z.B. Zeilensumme, Multiplikation)
  • Grundlegende Kenntnisse der Differentialrechnung: partielle Ableitung von einfachen Funktionen bilden.


Die Methoden werden während des Kurses kurz wiederholt, es wird aber davon ausgegangen, dass entsprechendes Vorwissen vorhanden ist bzw. überwiegend selbständig erworben wird.

Lernziele

Die Studierenden sollen

  • grundlegende Kompetenzen in quantitativer Systemanalyse zur Behandlung von Umwelt- und  Nachhaltigkeitsfragen erwerben
  • mit der Theorie sozio-ökologischer System vertraut werden und zeitgemäße Konzepte zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung, wie das des ‚safe operating space for humanity‘ kennenlernen und lernen, diese Konzepte kritisch zu diskutieren
  • die Grundlagen der Energie- und der Stoffstromanalyse verstehen und anwenden lernen
  • die Grundlagen der Input-Output-Analyse verstehen und anwenden lernen
  • mit den Grundkonzepten der Ökobilanzierung (LCA) vertraut werden
  • lernen, mit quantitativen Daten umzugehen, und insbesondere die Fehlerfortpflanzung und die Monte-Carlo-Simulation anzuwenden
  • mit gängiger Software (Excel oder R) konkrete Fallbeispiele des nachhaltigen Energie- und Stoffstrommanagements modellieren können
  • umfangreiches Faktenwissen zur stofflichen und energetischen Grundlage menschlicher Aktivitäten erwerben
  • den gesellschaftlichen Stoffwechsel als komplexes System verstehen lernen und mit den zentralen Strategien zum Umbau der biophysikalischen Grundlage unserer Gesellschaft vertraut werden
  • Verständnis über Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der vorhandenen Werkzeuge und Verfahren entwickeln und Erfahrungen in der Auswahl und Anwendung von quantitativen Analysemethoden sammeln

 

Literatur

Bücher in fetter Schrift dienen als Lehrmaterial während des Kurses!

  • Practical Handbook of Material Flow Analysis. By Paul H Brunner, and Helmut Rechberger. CRC/Lewis, 2004. ISBN: 0203507207. Provided on ILIAS.
  • Metabolism of the Anthroposphere, second edition. By Peter Baccini and Paul H. Brunner. MIT press, 2012, ISBN: 978-0262016650
  • Input-Output Analysis Foundations and Extensions. By R.E. Miller and P.D. Blair. Cambridge University Press, 2009. ISBN: 978-0521739023
  • The LCA Textbook. Chapters 1, 2, 8, and 10. http://www.lcatextbook.com/
  • Ökobilanz (LCA). Ein Leitfaden für Ausbildung und Beruf. By Walter Klöpffer und Birgit Grahl. Wiley-VCH, 2009. ISBN: 978-3-527-32043-1.
  • The Economics of the Coming Spaceship Earth. Kenneth E Boulding. Buchkapitel in “Environmental Quality in a Growing Economy”, 1966. Johns Hopkins University Press. http://www.ub.edu/prometheus21/articulos/obsprometheus/BOULDING.pdf
  • The role of in-use stocks in the social metabolism and in climate change mitigation. Stefan Pauliuk. Global Environmental Change 24, 2014, pp 132-142. DOI: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.11.006
  • IPCC, 2014: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2014: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Edenhofer, O., R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, E. Farahani, S. Kadner, K. Seyboth, A. Adler, I. Baum, S. Brunner, P. Eickemeier, B. Kriemann, J. Savolainen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow, T. Zwickel and J.C. Minx (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. http://www.ipcc.ch/pdf/assessment-report/ar5/wg3/ipcc_wg3_ar5_summary-for-policymakers.pdf

Ecosystem Management

(ACHTUNG: besonderes Belegverfahren - über den Verteiler wird Rechtzeitig darüber informiert)

Module coordination

Prof. Dr. Benno Pokorny

Prof. Dr. Michael Prgernig

Additional Lecturers

N.N.

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lectures, excursions, group work, tutorials, independent learning

Type of examination

Assessment Report (max. 2.500 words)

Syllabus

The concept of Ecosystem Management has merged as a new paradigm for the management of natural resources. It is based on the objectives of sustainable use and conservation of natural resources as well as fair and equitable sharing of benefits from ecosystem goods and services. Underpinning this approach are explicit objectives for the management of natural resources that can be translated into measurable goals, which lend themselves to monitoring. Ecosystem management recognizes that ecosystems are complex and interconnected systems, which function on a range of spatial and temporal scales. While management should be based on sound ecological models and understanding aiming at maintaining ecosystem integrity, the approach acknowledges that knowledge on ecosystems is limited and the paradigms provisional and likely to change in future. Consequently, management approaches are being viewed as hypotheses that require testing through systematic research and monitoring resulting in adaptive management. In this module, students will be introduced to the concepts underpinning the Ecosystem Management to enable them to critically evaluate the strengths and limitations of the approach. The module comprises a one-week excursion to visit landscape settings, which serve as a case study to examine the approach. In the last phase of the module, the students discuss their field experiences, and, based on that, work out a report in which they assess the feasibility, potential and limitations of the approach.

Learning goals and qualifications

Students learn to

  • understand basic ecological principles
  • identify and analyse the importance of ecosystem functions
  • interpret the main concepts underpinning the Ecosystem Management Approach
  • recognize the necessity to integrate social and natural science knowledge for effective ecosystem management
  • evaluate the strengths and limitations of the Ecosystem Management approach using a case study of a forested landscape in Central Europe
  • produce a framework for Ecosystem Management, recombining concepts and principles learned during the course

Core readings

  • Bundesamt für Naturschutz 2008. Landscape Planning. The basis of sustainable landscape development. BfN, Bonn. 50p
  • Cortner, H.J. and Moote, M.A. 1999. The politics of ecosystem management. Washington, DC: Island Press. Chapters 3+4 (pp. 37-72)
  • Noon, B.R. & J.A. Blakesley (2006): Conservation of the Northern Spotted Owl under the Northwest Forest Plan. Conservation Biology 20 (2): 288-296
  • Rigg, C. (2001): Orchestrating Ecosystem Management: Challenges and Lessons from Sequoia National Forest. Conservation Biology 15 (1): 78-90

 


Freilandökologie / Field Ecology

Module coordination

Prof. Dr. Alexandra Klein

Additional Lecturers

Dr. Helmer Schack-Kirchner

Teaching and Learning Methods

Lectures, tutorial, project work

Type of examination

Short research note (5-15 pages) (grade) and group presentation (pass/fail)

Prerequisites

Basic statistical knowledge, basic skills in R, basic knowledge on plant species identification

Syllabus

  • Learning various field methods used in soil ecology (i.e. water capacity, earthworm abundance), vegetation ecology (i.e. vegetation relevees, chlorophyll measurements) and animal ecology (flower observations, cafeteria experiments)
  • Development of own ecological research project (research questions, hypothesis, choice of method, analysis)
  • Execution of group project, utilizing the introduced and practiced methods and statistical analyses
  • Recognizing connections and context between the different fields of ecology
  • Making the connection to real-world scenarios, recognizing the relevance of the newly acquired skills and knowledge for future applications

Learning Goals and Qualifications

Students

  • will gain basic knowledge in field ecology and will be able to establish connections between different ecological disciplines.
  • will work in different habitats and landscapes and will therefore be able to generalize their acquired knowledge and skills.
  • can recognize connections between the different disciplines and can exemplify in ecological research projects.
  • will gain methodological knowledge in soil ecology, vegetation ecology and animal ecology and their relevance for real-world scenarios.

Readings

  • Methods reader (available on Ilias).
  • Relevant papers for lectures (will be announced in their specific lectures)